Modified 5x5

Not just that, but Louie Simmons only lives three hours from me. He might just drive over to Indianapolis and kick my ass, too. Is a 5 x 5 program the only way to get strong? Hell no, even though a lot of people will tell you that it is. But does it have its place? Can someone succeed on this style of program?

Is it possibly the most ideal program for an intermediate level lifter?

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Everyone wants to stroke their ego and feel important. They think they need an advanced program to see progress. But do they really? The beginning lifter can get stronger doing just about anything; however, the more volume a beginner gets the better.

His biggest gains are going to be neurological in nature, so just becoming more efficient at movements is going to equal more weight on the bar. In other words, if you want to squat more when starting out, volume is king — just get more squat reps in! The advanced lifter is going to need to be very selective in what methods he employs to get stronger.

Advanced lifters are much more neurologically efficient, meaning each and every rep they perform is going to create deeper inroads to their recovery process.

Simply put, an advanced lifter is going to get a lot more out of intensity based workouts versus volume dependent workouts. These lifters will get more out of squatting less e. So where does that leave our intermediate lifter? If you said somewhere in the middle, you get the gold star for the day! Basically, you get the best of both worlds: an increase in intensity while keeping your total volume up.

For many, a 5 x 5 five sets of five reps program really fits the bill. I think too many people want this program to be a panacea for every lagging muscle group or body part, so they absolutely destroy themselves.

Not only do they use this program for every exercise they perform, but then they never take recovery weeks on top of that. It was your own! Are we talking about chronological age? Training age? Relative strength levels?The Perfect Program? I'm going to get my ass kicked for writing this article. I can just see the hate mail pouring in. Not just that, but Louie Simmons only lives three hours from me.

modified 5x5

He might just drive over to Indianapolis and kick my ass, too. But what I'm going to say needs to be said. Is a 5 x 5 program the only way to get strong? Hell no, even though a lot of people will tell you that it is. Truthfully, there are a lot of drawbacks to this program, especially if you're a beginner or an advanced lifter. But does it have its place? Can someone succeed on this style of program? Is it possibly the most ideal program for an intermediate level lifter?

I think so, and that's why I'm going to risk getting my ass-kicked — so you can build some wheels of steel! Most people think they're way more advanced than they really are. Everyone wants to stroke their ego and feel important.

The StrongLifts 5×5 Workout: Why There Are Better Ways to Build Muscle

They think they need an advanced program to see progress. But do they really? Let's look at the differences between what a beginning, intermediate, and advanced lifter need to succeed. The beginning lifter can get stronger doing just about anything; however, the more volume a beginner gets the better. His biggest gains are going to be neurological in nature, so just becoming more efficient at movements is going to equal more weight on the bar.

In other words, if you want to squat more when starting out, volume is king — just get more squat reps in! The advanced lifter is going to need to be very selective in what methods he employs to get stronger.

modified 5x5

Too much volume and he's going to overtrain quickly. Advanced lifters are much more neurologically efficient, meaning each and every rep they perform is going to create deeper inroads to their recovery process. Simply put, an advanced lifter is going to get a lot more out of intensity based workouts versus volume dependent workouts. These lifters will get more out of squatting less e. So where does that leave our intermediate lifter? If you said somewhere in the middle, you get the gold star for the day!

Sets of 8, 10, 12 or 15 reps just isn't going to cut it, yet intermediates don't have the proper base of strength and technique to see great success with a program that puts a huge emphasis on low-volume and high-intensity. So for this lifter, a program that uses lower rep sets and focuses on increasing overall intensity after all, you can use more weight for 5's than you can 10'sis going to see good progress on this style of program.Perhaps the most influential book ever written on the subject of strength training for sports is Bill Starr's " The Strongest Shall Survive: Strength Training for Football " written in Since then, seemingly endless variations of Starr's original 5x5 routine have sprouted up all over the Net and for good reason - it is possibly the most perfect strength routine ever devised.

His routine focused on bench presses, squats and power cleans, done on a Monday - Wednesday - Friday rotation with heavy, medium and light days. Bill Starr popularized the "5x5" routine - each exercise was done following a protocol of five sets of five reps.

Starr's 5x5 routine uses the three exercises which Starr referred to as "the big three", quoting Starr:. In other words the athlete should be building total leg strength rather than just stronger hamstrings.

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He should be seeking overall strength in his shoulder girdle rather than just stronger deltoids It requires very little space and a minimum of equipment Wednesday - Light Power cleans - 5 sets of 5 Incline Bench - 5 sets of 5 1x10 weight from 3rd set Squats - 5 sets of 5 1x10 weight from 3rd set set 5 use weight from 3rd set of Monday. Friday - Medium Power cleans - 5 sets of 5 Overhead press - 5 sets of 5 1x10 weight from 3rd set Squats - 5 sets of 5 1x10 weight from 3rd set set 5 use weight from 3rd set of Monday set 5 use weight 4th set of Monday.

Monday — Heavy Day Squat — 5 sets of 5 Bench — 5 sets of 5 Powerclean — 5 sets of 5 Weighted hyperextensions - 2 sets Weighted sit-ups - 4 sets. Friday - Medium Squat — 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8 Bench — 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8 Powercleans — 4 sets of 5, 1 triple Weighted Dips- 3 sets of Triceps and Biceps - 3 sets of 8 each.

Friday - Medium Powerclean — 5 sets of 5 Benchpress — 5 sets of 5 Squat — 5 sets of 5. By far of all of the variations of coach Starr's original routines, the two of them that are the most used and advanced in term of principles are those ones by " Madcow " and coach Mark Rippetoe.

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Madcow' variation isn't one routine, it features several based on the trainer's needs and uses deloading phases, dual factor training, and hypertrophy phases.

All the sets shown 3x5 are all working or "live" sets, not counting warmups sets. Additional supplementary exercises can be added, but very sparingly. Abdominal work can be used as a cool-down. Grip work can be added to the end as needed too. Workouts A and B alternate on 3 non-consecutive days per week.

Proof of concept that coach Rippetoe's novice routine works isn't only found by the five star rating that "Starting Strength" receives regularly on Amazon.

More proof that these variants work on the vast majority of the population can be found on the excellent " StrongLifts " website which features its own variant of Bill Starr's 5x5. Week A Day 1 Squat - 3x5 Bench press - 3x5 Chin-ups - 3 sets weight added so failure occurs at 5 to 7 reps. Day 3 Squat - 3x5 Bench press - 3x5 Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure, unweighted.

Day 3 Squat - 3x5 Press - 3x5 Pull-ups - 3 sets, weight added so failure occurs at 5 to 7 reps. Friday - Medium Squat — 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8 Bench — 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8 Barbell Row or Powerclean — 4 sets of 5, 1 triple, 1 set of 8 for rows Weighted Dips - 3 sets of Triceps Extension and Biceps Curl - 3 sets of 8 each.

Gain slabs of muscle real fast with our free exclusive e-book and join the thousands already on our VIP list to get regular updates, training tips and supplement advice, straight to your inbox.Results 1 to 10 of Thread: Modified 5x5 Workout? Modified 5x5 Workout? I have been reading a lot about the various 5x5 workouts for building up strength before you start training for mass.

Most call for a three day split, with an A and B rotation. At the age of 41, my concern is recovery from hitting major muscles every other day.

Has anyone tried a modified 5x5 over a four day split? You'll need more pulling to balance the pressing. I'd add pullups or lat pulldowns to the B day, and I'd consider either a 2x5 for the deadlift and making the other sets warmups or doing more reps at a lighter weight, e. You can't help the hopeless. I started SL5x5 at age 44 after a 10 year layoff from lifting and it didn't impact recovery.

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What caused me to stop running it was I couldn't continue to add 10lbs on squats every single workout so I switched to an intermediate one. I've even thrown in running SL5x5 every once in a while to see if I can better my squat numbers. Start with just the bar as recommend if you happen to try SL5x5. It's boring at first and you may think you're wasting time with just the bar. However in about 5 weeks after adding lbs to squat and deads you'll look back wistfully on those "easy" weeks. Looks like a bad idea OP.

Deadlifting a x5 2x a week is WAY more work than any beginner program would have you do. You are worried about recovery on a 5x5? So you created a program which is far more difficult to recover from. I'd run something cookie cutter that somebody who knew what they were doing put out. Any option is better than grinding yourself into the ground with the program in the OP.

The most important aspect of weight training; whether for the athlete, bodybuilder, or average person is to better ones health and ability without injury. Been doing Madcow 5x5 intermediate now since September. At 60, recovery has not been a problem. You do get two recovery days after every cycle. I'm out, standing in my field. OP I think you must have misread something. In fact I have never seen one that doesn't incorporate regular rest days.

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In which case they have more recovery than your suggested program. Originally Posted by Flounderbout. Originally Posted by ReverendWolfe. Si vis pacem, para barbellum. Supplement Wars! Replies: 2 Last Post:PM.

Replies: 13 Last Post:AM.People need to believe that existing training regimens really do work and that life does not have to be that complicated. Today I will share with you the tried and true 5x5 program. Yes it does work. O ver the years training has become more and more complicated. Show the average modern day trainee a simple and effective training regimen and they will look at you like you are dumb enough to buy a time-share.

They just cannot believe that simple training programs work. They want to believe that training is a complicated progress so they can spend more time planning workouts than doing workouts.

This is not surprising, as many people tend to complicate everything in life these days. So it is not surprising that the masses feel that complicated training regimens are a necessity. The bottom line is that standard training regimens that have been tried and tested over the years are hard to beat. One such program is the well-known 5x5 five sets of five program.

It was the favorite of Reg Park who just so happens to be one of Arnold's idols for a simple reason. The program rocks and when applied correctly builds a tremendous amount of size and strength.

With all of the thousands of training regimens to choose from the 5x5 program remains as one of the most effective programs for packing on size and strength. It has just the right amount of intensity and volume to build strength and size without inducing burnout and over-training.

In this article, I am going to go over what the 5x5 program is and how to apply it. Then, I am going to go over several ways to take the intensity up a notch for further gains in size and strength.

If you are tired of complicating programs that take more time to plan than execute, then you are going to love the 5x5 protocol. Let's get started. What Is 5x5? The 5x5 program calls for doing five sets of five reps per exercise. To illustrate, lets use the barbell deadlift as an example.

Do two warm-up sets to get the groove down. Then load the bar up to your working weight and do five sets. When you can do five reps on all five sets, increase the weight by five pounds. For a focus on strength, take 3-minute breaks in between each set. For a focus on size, try second breaks in between each set. Finally, for the middle path, try two-minute breaks in between each set. To design a 5x5 program you can either do a split routine in which you do the upper body one day and lower body the next training session.

Or you can do a full-body workout times per week. It will take some experimenting to determine which option is best for you. Regardless, of which option your choose, focus on compound exercises for each workout such as bench presses, squats, deadlifts, weighted dips, barbell rows, etc. Some isolation work is acceptable, but do not get carried away. Focus on exercises that give you the most bang for your buck.

Now you could do the same exercises frequently such as bench presses three times a week 5x5 style. Or you could try Louie Simmons conjugate approach to switch things up.

For example, do bench presses on Monday, weighted dips on Wednesday, and incline presses on Friday. You will avoid overuse injuries and the exercises are similar enough that you will make progress on all three and build overall strength.Results 1 to 10 of Thread: Modified 5X5 Workout. Modified 5X5 Workout So, I have been following a beginners full body program,with the 10 rep range as I read that it establishes a mind muscle connection and a beginner can actually get stronger and bigger with this range Im open to suggestions and critics.

Originally Posted by DetMatthews. Originally Posted by Supersayian Union ironworker, USMC vet, muay thai, kyokushin kartae, judoka. Originally Posted by Jasonk There is no way you're going to get your 5RM for 3 sets. So, I have been following a beginners full body program,with the 10 rep range as I read that it establishes a mind muscle connection and a beginner can actually get stronger and bigger with this range Originally Posted by brucedelaney.

This is really 3x5 with 2 warm up sets What is your planned progression? Are you planning to Deadlift 5x5?

If so I honestly wouldn't recommend it. Once the workout get's heavy you'll destroy the rest of you B workout for the day. My recommendation would be to take a look at JasonDB's 5x5 program here since it's pretty similar to what you've listed but has a fully planned out progression with resets and de-loads as well.

The order sounds good to me, I would consider changing to a set incremental progression something like 10LB on Deadlifts, 5 on everything else just to keep it easy. If you're going by a percentage, once the weight gets up there the weight jump becomes much bigger too. Other then that, it seems like a program you can progress on for quite a while if you don't start out too heavy.

Gave you some greenz to use for the future Supplement Wars! Replies: 2 Last Post:PM. Replies: 8 Last Post:AM. Replies: 5 Last Post:AM. Replies: 4 Last Post:AM.

Bookmarks Bookmarks Digg del.Or should you be using higher reps and lighter weights? There are two different workouts alternated throughout the week. In workout A, you do the squat, bench press, and barbell row. The lifts in workout B are the squat, overhead press, and deadlift. For each exercise, you do 5 sets of 5 reps. The exception is the deadlift, which you do for 1 set of 5 reps. You take a day of rest between each training day.

Your goal is to keep on adding weight to each exercise for as long as you can. Although guys like Bill Starr and Reg Park seem to get much of the credit for coming up with the idea, Mark Berry who was a champion weightlifter was writing about it back in the s. You just go to the gym three times a week, stick to the plan, and focus on training as hard as possible. Squats are done three times a week. But the bench press, overhead press, row and deadlift are performed three times every two weeks.

But the chest, back and shoulders are worked directly only 1.

Madcow 5×5: Workout for Intermediate Lifters

In fact, working a muscle more frequently has been shown in several studies to increase the speed at which that muscle grows. In one trial, subjects using a full-body routine, where each muscle is trained three times a week, grew faster than subjects on a split routine, where each muscle is trained once a week [ 1 ].

modified 5x5

In fact, most research out there shows that the major muscles should be trained at least twice a week in order to maximize growth [ 2 ]. One argument that goes back and forth in the fitness industry centers on the number of sets you need to do for each muscle group. Some say that one set to failure is the fastest, most effective way to put on muscle. Anything more is overtraining, and you might as well just not bother.

In other words, the more sets you do — up to a point at least — the faster your muscles will grow.

Buff Dudes 5x5 Workout Routine - Day 1

However, the weekly training volume for the chest, back and shoulders averages just 7. However, lower reps and heavier weights are a perfectly good way to gain muscle mass. A good example comes from a University of Central Florida study, where researchers put a group of 33 resistance-trained men through eight weeks of strength training [ 4 ]. Group one did four sets of reps. They also took around 60 seconds of rest between each set. Group two did the same exercises.

They also did the same number of sets. But, they used a much heavier weight that limited them to reps, taking around 3 minutes of rest between sets. However, the researchers did find a clear trend towards greater gains in the group lifting heavier weights.

One study is never the be-all-end-all when it comes to deciding how to train, and this is far from being the last word on rep ranges and muscle growth. However, the findings do show that heavy weights and lower reps in the range can be used to put on muscle. Compared to higher reps, fatigue is minimal, so exercise technique is less likely to go down the pan.